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  1. Introduction
  2. Network Model
  3. Topology
  4. Physical Media
  5. Wireless Media
  6. Network Card
  7. Modems
  8. Outside Connections
  9. Wide Area Network Connections
  10. Repeaters, Bridges, Routers
  11. Network Types
  12. Ethernet
  13. Token Ring
  14. ARCnet
  15. AppleTalk
  16. FDDI
  17. Architecture Comparisons
  18. Categories
  19. TCP/IP
  20. IPX/SPX
  21. NetBEUI
  22. AppleTalk
  23. SNA
  24. Others
  25. Suites and Network Layers
  26. Installing Drivers
  27. DNS
  28. Network Operating Systems
  29. Applications, mail, groupware, DBMS
  30. Backing up the network
  31. Troubleshooting
  32. Web, SNMP, admin, firewalls
  33. Networking Terms and Definitions
  34. Credits

Network Topology

Topology describes the method used to do the physical wiring of the network. The three topologies are:

  1. Bus - Both ends of the network must be terminated with a terminator. A barrel connector can be used to extend it. Computers are connected to the main cable in a line.
  2. Star - All devices revolve around a central hub, which is what controls the network communications, and can communicate with other hubs. Range limits are about 100 meters from the hub.
  3. Ring - Devices are connected from one to another, as in a ring. A data token is used to grant permission for each computer to communicate.

Many times these topologies are combined on a network to form a star-ring for token ring, or a star-bus.

Types of Transmission

  1. Baseband - Data bits are defined by discrete signal changes.
  2. Broadband - Uses analog signals to divide the cable into several channels with each channel at its own frequency. Each channel can only transmit one direction.