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  1. Linux Manual
  2. Installation & Internet
  3. About the Author
  4. Content
  5. Installation
  6. Choosing a Linux Distribution
  7. Partition types
  8. Fdisk
  9. Understanding Mount Point /mnt
  10. Linux File Structure
  11. Creating a boot disk
  12. Welcome to Linux Installation
  13. Installation mode
  14. Partitioning
  15. Creating partitions with Druid
  16. Creating partitions manually
  17. Formatting Partitions
  18. Individual packages selection
  19. The root account
  20. Network configuration
  21. The time zone
  22. Configuring Services
  23. Configuring X
  24. Installing Mandrake 9.1 & 9.2
  25. Installation Class
  26. The Drake X Partitioning
  27. Package Selection
  28. Configuring X
  29. The Internet
  30. Creating a new user
  31. Getting online
  32. Configuring the connection (Dial UP)
  33. High Speed Internet
  34. DSL Modems and Cable modems
  35. Connecting DSL as DHCP
  36. Setting up a Plain Cable Modem (DOCSIS)
  37. Connecting an ISDN
  38. Using Routers
  39. Login Protocols
  40. PPPoE
  41. WAN IP Address
  42. Commercial Configuration
  43. Troubleshooting

Creating partitions manually

Creating partitions manually is the best way to learn about what types of file system are available. Once you become an expert you might want to try other file system, or maybe your project may require you to mount other file system. If that is the case, you must be ready when the times come.

Creating the /root partition

Click on the blank space of your hard drive, an option create pops up, right where it says choose action.

Creating the root partition
Fig. 1.17

- Click on create and you will see another popup window with:

  • Start sector:
  • Size in MB:
  • File system type:
  • Mount point:
  • Preference:

You have to study this window carefully; here is where you set the size of each partition and the mount point.

  • Do not complicate your life, leave start sector by default.
  • To set the size, use the slide bar to set the desired size (about 400 MB).
  • Leave File system type as: Journalized FS: ext3 (ext3 is an improved version of ext2) if you want to select another file system type use the dropdown arrow.
  • To set the first partition to root use the drop down arrow and select / (/ stands for root, this first partition will hold all the files to start the system)
  • That's it no preference
  • Click OK,

Root partition just created.

To create the next partitions follow the same steps, but select each appropriate file system.

Create the swap partition:

  • Click on the blank space of your hard drive
  • Click on create
  • Adjust the size in MB as desired (use twice the size of your physical RAM for swap size)
  • Leave as: Journalized FS:ext3
  • Mount point should be swap
  • Click OK,

Partition swap created

Create the /usr partition

  • Click on the remaining blank space of your hard drive
  • Click on create
  • Adjust the size desired
  • Leave as Journalized FS:ext3
  • Mount point should be /usr
  • Click Ok

User partition created

Creating the /var Partition

The var partition is important, when deciding the size it should take some consideration. The var partition holds the information regarding the spooling system; such as spool of the mail server, printing, logs of the system and others. Depending on the system, when fully loaded the spools and logs can grow tremendously which could cause the system to slow in performance. My recommendation is make this partition slightly bigger than the others.
  • Click on the remaining blank space of your hard drive
  • Click on create
  • Adjust the desired size
  • Leave as Journalized FS:ext3
  • Mount point should be /var
  • Click Ok,

Var partition created.

Creating the /home partition

Here is where the users profile will be stored each time you add user.

  • Click on the remaining disk space
  • Click on create
  • Adjust or set the desired size
  • Leave file system type as Journalized FS:ext3
  • Mount point should be /home
  • Click OK

Home partition created.

Creating the /tmp partition

Yes you guessed it. This is the temporary directory. As you already know, it is used to store temporary files, for example when you go online this is where the system stores the pages you temporarily view.

  • Click on the remaining disk space
  • Click on create
  • Adjust or set the desired size
  • Leave file system type as Journalized FS:ext3
  • Mount point should be /tmp
  • Click OK

/tmp partition created.

That wasn't that difficult, was it? All your partitions are now created the next step is to save it on to the disk.

  • Click on Done.
Write Partition
Fig. 1.18

Once you click OK, the partitions will be saved.