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  1. Introduction
  2. Windows 2000 Professional
  3. Windows 2000 Server
  4. Windows 2000 Advanced Server
  5. Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
  6. Application Support
  7. System Operation
  8. Disks and Volumes
  9. Filesystems
  10. Configuration Files
  11. Security
  12. Network Support
  13. Access Management
  14. Processes
  15. AD Structure
  16. AD Objects
  17. AD Object Naming
  18. AD Schema
  19. AD Sites
  20. Domains
  21. AD Functions
  22. AD Replication
  23. DNS
  24. AD Security
  25. AD Installation
  26. AD Configuration
  27. AD Performance
  28. Installation
  29. Installation Options
  30. Unattended Installation
  31. Software Distribution
  32. Remote Installation Service
  33. Language
  34. Accessibility
  35. File Attributes
  36. Shares
  37. Distributed File System
  38. Control Panel
  39. Active Directory Tools
  40. Computer Management Console Tools
  41. MMC Tools
  42. Network Tools
  43. Network Monitor
  44. System Performance Monitoring
  45. Tools
  46. Managing Services
  47. Connections
  48. TCP/IP
  49. DHCP
  50. Printing
  51. Routing
  52. IPSec
  53. ICS
  54. Fault Tolerance
  55. Backup
  56. System Failure
  57. Services
  58. Remote Access
  59. WINS
  60. IIS
  61. Certificate Server
  62. Terminal Services
  63. Web Services
  64. Authentication
  65. Accounts
  66. Permissions
  67. Groups
  68. User Rights and Auditing
  69. Auditing
  70. User Profiles
  71. Policies
  72. Group Policies
  73. Miscellaneous
  74. Terms
  75. Credits

Windows 2000 Processes

Process Priority Setting

Process priority may be set to a value from 1 to 31. Priorities are categorized as follows:

  • 0-7 - Low user
  • 7-15 - High user
  • 15-23 - Real Time
  • 23-31 - Administration only

Base thread priority is 8. Threads inherit the base priority of their parent process. The NT operating system can vary priorities higher or lower by a value of two in order to remain responsive. Processes may be launched with different priority settings from the command line using the following syntax:

start /priority /path/name.exe

The "/path/name.exe" is the path to and name of the program to be run. Where /priority may be:

  • /low - Priority 4
  • /belownormal - Priority 6
  • /normal - Priority 8
  • /high - Priority 13
  • /realtime - Priority 24

Other options:

  • /min - The application starts in a minimized start window.
  • /max - The application starts in a maximized start window.
  • /separate - The application starts in a separate memory area.
  • /shared - The application starts in a shared memory area.

Setting Priority of foreground tasks

To modify foreground task priority use the system applet in the control panel. Selecting the performance tab will allow three foreground task settings to be set. If set to none on the left, foreground tasks are not boosted in priority, On the middle setting foreground tasks get a priority increase of 1. On the right on the maximum setting, foreground tasks get a priority increase of two.

Task Manager

Can be used to start and stop applications, change process priority, and monitor performance statistics. It can be used to change the priority of a process, by right clicking on the process and selecting "Set Priority". Can enter the task manager one of the following ways:

  • Press CTRL ALT DEL and select Task Manager
  • Press CTRL SHIFT ESC
  • Right click the taskbar and select Task Manager
  • Select "Start, "Run", and type "taskmgr".

Tabs include:

  • Applications
  • Processes - Shows PID, CPU, CPU time, and memory usage.
  • Performance - Shows:
    • CPU usage and history
    • Memory usage and history
    • Total handles, threads, and processes
    • Physical memory
    • Commit Charge - Memory allocated to the system or programs.
    • Kernel memory