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  1. Introduction
  2. Windows 2000 Professional
  3. Windows 2000 Server
  4. Windows 2000 Advanced Server
  5. Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
  6. Application Support
  7. System Operation
  8. Disks and Volumes
  9. Filesystems
  10. Configuration Files
  11. Security
  12. Network Support
  13. Access Management
  14. Processes
  15. AD Structure
  16. AD Objects
  17. AD Object Naming
  18. AD Schema
  19. AD Sites
  20. Domains
  21. AD Functions
  22. AD Replication
  23. DNS
  24. AD Security
  25. AD Installation
  26. AD Configuration
  27. AD Performance
  28. Installation
  29. Installation Options
  30. Unattended Installation
  31. Software Distribution
  32. Remote Installation Service
  33. Language
  34. Accessibility
  35. File Attributes
  36. Shares
  37. Distributed File System
  38. Control Panel
  39. Active Directory Tools
  40. Computer Management Console Tools
  41. MMC Tools
  42. Network Tools
  43. Network Monitor
  44. System Performance Monitoring
  45. Tools
  46. Managing Services
  47. Connections
  48. TCP/IP
  49. DHCP
  50. Printing
  51. Routing
  52. IPSec
  53. ICS
  54. Fault Tolerance
  55. Backup
  56. System Failure
  57. Services
  58. Remote Access
  59. WINS
  60. IIS
  61. Certificate Server
  62. Terminal Services
  63. Web Services
  64. Authentication
  65. Accounts
  66. Permissions
  67. Groups
  68. User Rights and Auditing
  69. Auditing
  70. User Profiles
  71. Policies
  72. Group Policies
  73. Miscellaneous
  74. Terms
  75. Credits

Windows 2000 Fault Tolerance

Windows 2000 Professional supports stripe sets but not mirroring or any other fault tolerance exclusive of sector sparing. The below mechanisms are fault tolerance mechanisms except for Disk Striping (RAID0):

  • Disk mirroring (RAID1) - One disk is a mirror copy of the other. This is geared for reliablilty, not speed. The boot and system partition may be mirrored. Mirrored volumes must be of the same size. Mirroring is done by clicking on the volume to be mirrored while holding the CTRL key down, then clicking on some free space of equal or greater size while the CTRL key is held down. Then click "Fault Tolerance", "mirror", and "establish mirror". To break a mirror, click on the mirror, and break.
  • Disk Striping (RAID0) - Data is split into sections with part of the data being written to each disk in parallel. Can use 2 to 32 disks. This provides speed but not reliability unless disk striping with parity is used. Each partition in a stripe set must be the same size. The boot or system partition may not be part of a stripe set. Data is stored in 64K blocks. Must drives be of the same type to be part of a stripe set? (I don't think so.)
  • Disk striping with parity (RAID2/3/4/5) - The same as disk striping except an additional disk that stores parity information is used. Can use 3 to 32 disks. The parity information may be used to recreate the contents of a failed drive. At least three disks are required to create a stripe set with parity. To make a stripe set from Disk Administrator, click on three areas of free space on three drives. From the fault tolerance menu choose "create stripe set with parity". Select the "Partition" menu, "commit changes". Reboot, then format the stripe set by highlighting the stripe set and selecting "tools", and "format".
  • Disk duplexing - Each disk gets its own controller so one controller failure can't bring both disks down. Without redundant controllers, this is the same as disk mirroring.
  • Replication - One server is a complete copy of another in case one server fails. One is used as a primary server and the other is a backup server.

Redundant Array of Inexpensive disks (RAID)

RAID is a fault tolerant method of storing data, meaning that a failure can occur and the system will still function. When RAID is hardware supported, the RAID hardware will perform parity calculations, thus freeing the system. The various RAID categories are:

  • 0 - Disk striping - Data is written across multiple drives in parallel. Different parts of the data is written at the same time to more than one drive. If there are two drives, half the data is written to one drive, while the rest of the data is written to the other drive. All partitions on striped drives must be the same size. No fault tolerance is provided with RAID-0.
  • 1 - Disk mirroring - All the data is written to two drives so each drive has a complete of all stored data. If one drive fails, the other can be used to get a copy of the data. To be more fault tolerant, more than one controller card may be used to control the mirrored hard drives. This is called disk duplexing and will allow the system to keep functioning if one controller card fails.
  • 2 - Disk striping with error correction codes (ECC).
  • 3 - Disk striping with ECC parity information stored on a separate drive.
  • 4 - Disk striping with blocks with parity information stored on a separate drive.
  • 5 - Disk striping with blocks with parity information stored using multiple drives. Uses five disks with one fifth of each one to store parity information.

Windows 2000 Server supports RAID 0, 1, and 5.

Computer Mnanagement Administrative Tool

The administrative tool called "Computer Management" is used to create and manage RAID volumes. To perform disk management, enter the "Computer Management" tool, click on the + next to "Storage", and select the "Disk Management" folder. At this point, volumes or partitions can be created, disk mirroring or duplexing may be set up or broken. RAID drives can only be created on Windows 2000 volumes which are dynamic volumes rather than partitions. See the section callled "Disks and Volumes" in this guide.

Volume Sets

Volume sets are used to extend volumes across multiple hard drives. Neither the system nor boot partition may be part of a volume set. A volume set may use different type drives (IDE, SCSI) and can be any combination of FAT, NTFS or filesystem that NT can use.

Extending Partitions

The boot partition cannot be extended in size.

Repairing a mirrored drive

  1. Replace the failed hard drive.
  2. Break mirror set using the "Computer Management" administrative tool.
  3. Create a new mirror set.

Tape Drive Addition

Tape drives are added using the "Tape Devices" applet in the Control Panel. You can allow the tape to be detected automatically or use the drivers tab to select and add a driver.